A Trip to the Races

An important reason to have the van ready before June was our 24th visit in 30 years to the “Circuit de la Sarthe” for the Le Mans 24 Hour WEC Sportscar race. Over the years we have camped at the circuit off the back of a motorbike with the army of the great unwashed, at club camp sites away from the circuit, in the car on the main car parks and recently in our T5/T6 vans again at the circuit. And while conditions have improved by Saturday and Sunday they still become a bit unsavoury. So this year was luxury with our own comfortable facilities to the track.

Taking Fred is limiting as he is not allowed on Friday pit walk and while he is allowed in all the public areas it is not fair or right to take him in amongst the really tick crowds. Otherwise he is absolutely fine amongst the noise of the race cars and all night long as they roar past every few minutes. Unfortunately he is not that interested in the racing so we have to work to keep him occupied. What does bother him though is the camp site fireworks at night which tend to be worse on Friday and Sunday.

Despite the limitations we camp near Arnage. We can watch racing and qualifying from here and we walk in to the circuit and watch from the kart circuit just before the main straight and stands. We also enjoy a few walks around the pit village and all the concessions and of course a few gold plated beers and coffees. These days that have neat reusable plastic beakers and glasses with artwork for each year. They charge you €1 a piece but they are great souvenirs and perfectly usable afterwards.

This year a highlight of the pit village for me was on the Aston Martin stand. They had on display 2 of their new top end cars alongside the first of a limited edition of hand built DB4 Superleggera. Built as a track ready collectors car it is to say the least drop dead gorgeous. However if you want one you also have to buy the new modern version and as a pair they are £6M + VAT. The press are valuing the DB4 at least £3.1M +VAT.

The race itself was the usual mix of 4 classes of GTE cars in amongst Prototypes. The fast cars lap at around 3′ 20″ and the slower production based cars at around 3′ 50″ which makes for interesting racing once they get mixed up. The only way to follow the race is to listen to Radio Le Mans, an English language station that broadcast all week from qualifying to the end of the race. During the night we manage to get 6 hours sleep only woken when the pace car comes out and the cars bunch up and the engine note drops. Winning the race is about outright pace and good management – just think by 13:00 on Sunday the cars have basically completed 11 Grand Prix distances and still have one more to do and will have completed close to 4000 miles by the time they see the chequered flag.

So will we be back next year? Well the jury is out n that one as we have been so many times and it will be a long way from Scotland just for a weekend. Perhaps we will just have a Le Mans party instead.

Le Mans 2015

Although we haven’t been for a few years this was our 21st trip to “La Sarthe”. In the past we have camped both at the circuit and with organised groups a way from the circuit. Our last few trips were spent sleeping in the car. The previous couple of trips were from our house in Brittany so an easy Saturday morning drive and home in time to BBQ on Sunday.

This time we were on the circuit near the Porsche Curves for 5 days. We bought a generator to take with us as few would be off grid for the whole time. Our push bikes went with us and came in very handy to get from the camp site to the village and the heart of the circuit.

For the first time we caught the tram into the city for lunch and to see the divers parade to the streets. Unfortunately it was wet and cold and not much fun.