Water & Waste

Collecting together domestic stuff I need to build a domestic water and waste system.

I am starting to get to grips with the water, waste and sanitary on board a camper van. We will have a toilet with a sink and shower but don’t for one minute imagine a spacious bathroom.

Once we get the van I will get two tank kits from CAK Tanks in Kenilworth. One will be 100ltr of fresh water and the other about the same of grey water. These underslung tanks will be wrapped in insulation to guard against freezing and will be plumbed into the kitchen and toilet / shower room. They will both have senders to the control panels so we know when they need emptying and filling.

Shurflo Pomp

Fresh water will be pumped from the tank through 15mm push fit plastic plumbing by a small 10ltr Shurflo Trailking on demand pump that actuates by the pressure drops when a tap is opened. These are nice reliable little units for motorhomes and marine use. Operating on 12V it will have a master switch on the control panel.

Binar Water Heater

Hot water will be supplied to the toilet sink and shower via a Binar 5S12 diesel water heater. This is part of a Russian made family of air and water heaters for boats and leisure vehicles. It comes as a complete kit ready to install with a small temperature controller. It will give enough hot water for a shower or wash using a few drops of fuel. They are very compact and I haven’t decided yet whether this should be underslung or whether I can find space in side.

Telford Toilet

The toilet unit will be a built in Telford 403L Cassette type system with an electric flush from the pumped water system. It has a  level indicator for the 19L cassette that can be withdrawn for emptying from the storage space behind the rear doors.




Swift Sink

The sink unit is a neat one that I found from O’Leary Motorhomes. It is actually a spare item for a Swift camper van and looks so much better than the cheap moulded sinks that are on the market. When it folds up it leaves a nice flat panel and the challenge will be to match the finish of that with the rest of the toilet / shower.

I have to find the kitchen sink.  I have seen what we want but am having trouble getting one but I will. Then we need a simple shower unit and a plug in one outside for dog washing and the like.

The grey waste will all collect from the drains into the grey water tank. This will be emptied by a simple dump valve when you are parked over the grating at a service point. It will have a flushing inlet so that it can get a quick clean out occasionally and both the tanks will have facilities for opening them up for cleaning every year,

Power Scheme

Getting the electrical supply right will be important for living off grid and wild camping

With our new van we want to be able to travel for longer, not worry about the seasons and avoid too many expensive camp sites. To do these things a greater degree of self sufficiency when it comes to electrical power would be useful. We don’t have too many electrical devices, in fact the fridge and lights are probably the most demanding as well as enough juice to fire the hob and a bit of USB charging for phones and pads. The only real difference in our new van will be a 230V microwave for which we will need an inverter which will also be useful for charging tooth brushes, for the occasional hair drier and maybe a toaster.

Travelling in Norway this year we only used MHU (Mains Hook Up) once or twice to charge my toothbrush. Other than that travelling most days or parked up with solar kept us just about topped up although it got touch and go a couple of times. Van Blanc had a 110Ah leisure battery and a 100W solar panel and one advantage of a pop up roof is that we could get a better angle of incidence on the panel. So this time we have decided that overkill is a good plan, enough power for a few days parked up off grid and out of season.

Our van will come with a 98Ah starter battery and the larger 180A alternator so we are off to a good start.

Leoch Powabloc

We have bought two very large batteries, 12V 205Ah Leoch Gel Tubular Plate deep-cycle Powabloc from Alpha Batteries. These Gel Tubular Plate batteries have capacity ratings of  205Ah (100hr), 180Ah (20hr) with true deep-cycle and deep-discharge capabilities. They are sealed & maintenance-free and have a typical max. cycle life of 1500 cycles @ 80% DoD and come with 6-year warranty. The only minor draw back is that they weigh 60kg each but given that the van is rated at 3,5T we have a bit of headroom. They will sit on the floor out of sight ahead of the rear axle.

Xplorer Solar Panel

On the roof of the van we have space for 2 big solar panels so we have bought two 200W panels. These are Xplorer 1200 x 990 again from Alpha Batteries. They are a good quality German made panel that come with a 6 year warranty. I will have to devise some brackets that keep them low on the roof and an airfoil to reduce the wind resistance and any noise.

Next we have to manage the power, battery to battery charging from a Euro 6 source, solar charge control, mains hook up charging and all the other system management. Our previous vans were simpler and a learning curve but for this one we wanted a good integrated system. In the end we have got a complete Votronic system which is a little more expensive but should all integrate.

Votonic Triple

We will use a Votronic VBCS 60/40/430 Triple controller. This will manage the charge from the vehicle battery / alternator when we are on the, from the solar panels when the sun shines and from mains hook up. It can manage the input and charge from all three of these sources and look after the starter battery as well as the leisure batteries.

Votronic Jupiter Panel

The controller itself will be monitored through a Votronic VPC Jupiter 400 panel with a blue tooth connector for a mobile phone app. Not only will it display current battery and charge states but it will warn if the levels are too low. In addition it will also provide switching for the water pump, monitor the fresh grey water tank levels and the inside and outside temperatures.

Votronic Inverter

And then there is the occasional need for 230V which will be managed by a Votronic Inverter SMI 1700 ST NVS pure sine wave inverter. This will provide a steady 1700w to 230V outlets from batteries or direct from mains if hooked up. Being pure sine wave all sorts of electronics devices could be connected.

Of course there are all sorts of other wires, switches and plugs to take account of and make safe. There will be a Commando plug for mains hook up, a double pole consumer unit with reverse polarity warning and a couple of boxes of 12V fuses to protect everything.