Week Four

This was to be window week. Time to be brave.

The Seitz S6 windows are made to suit a curved wall with a radius of 5m. Taking several dimensions off the van and setting them out in CAD I found that the radius varied from 5m to 10m but I guess the frame and window will take up what equates to a small variation and won’t be noticeable. I have after all seen flat windows successfully installed on to curved walls.

The RH window frame I made fitted the curve of the window and the blind perfectly so I made up the LH slider frame. The only difference being that the RH is as far forward as I can get it whereas the slider is in the middle. The frames are made up of 3 layers of 6mm ply and one of 3mm which gives 22mm and the steel skin will add 1mm so pretty much bang on the 22-23mm spec from Seitz.

The frame for the Midi Heki is different in that it has a stepped shape on top for the curve of the roof but a flat bottom for the blind. I am keeping it slim as I want to avoid losing head height so that with the roof curve and ribs I will end up with c.32mm. Installing this frame and the rooflight will involve quite a bit of packing and sealant.

While I am at it I decided that a large white roof light is going to look very out of place even if you only see a bit of it. So a can of Halfords grey bumper paint later and voila..

And the frame for the Fiamma roof vent is much smaller and simpler. It is small enough to ignore the curve and just needed a bit of “fitting” so that it will go tight up to the last roof beam.

The time came to bite the bullet and cut the window holes in the van. Fortunately I had the loan of a heated workshop for a few days which made it a whole lot easier. Taking an air saw to our shiny new van was a bit scary but seems to have worked well. Even though I left the corners to last the slider in particular got a bit wild and wobbly making the last cuts but it seems to have survived it OK. One important thing to remember is a few bits of gaffer tape to hold on to the cut out piece and avoid it falling on to the outside paintwork.

First we touched up the bare metal cut with some Hammerite before cleaning around the area with a dab of acetone. The window inner frame was bonded with Sikaflex 252 structural adhesive and clamped for a while until it grabbed. The window was sealed with a good bead of SikaLastomer 710 that squidged out nicely. Cleaning the excess the next day was easy – simply go round with a blunt table knife and pull the excess off. The blind is a temporary fit until we work out how to finish the wall around it.

Fitting the roof vents was similar but complicated by the ribs and the slight curve. The outer sides of the cut for the Midi Heki coincided with a rim so left a useful upstand. I found some 25 x 10mm rigid plastic that I fitted between the ribs and inside that outer rib. All of this and the frame were bonded again with Sikaflex 252 and then the remaining few millimetres of the curve built up with layers of 20 x 2mm butyl rubber tape. Finally the roof vents were lowered in with a good bead of SikoLastomer and once clamped does I went round with more SikoLastomer to fill any gaps. No it doesn’t look pretty but that will only bother you if you are 10ft tall.

It has rained a lot for 2 days since we fitted the windows and roof lights and, touch wood, no leaks. While it was raining I took a drive to TPS to fetch the last piece of B post trim that finishes off the post nicely. The cab headlining needs a bit of adjusting and I need to get a nice grab handle like one from a T5/6.

So then it was on to the floor. I was told about the big strip of glue up the middle so got prepared. A few lengths of 3 x 1.5in CLS one of which I cut a chisel point on to one piece and I soon had the floor up. Getting rid of the glue was another story. I managed to pick the floor clean quite easily but getting it off the reverse of the floor ply was very difficult. So much so that it pulled the skin off my thumb.

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